RIYL: Charles Bradley, Lee Field & The Expressions, Vintage Soul, Daptone Records

Label: Light In The Attic

Light In The Attic has dug up and reissued another long sought-after gem from the past. Lee Moses’ 1971 album Time and Place came and went when it was originally released, but over the years soul and R&B fans have elevated it to the cult status it deserves. Check out Moses’ raw and emotional soul power below and pick up the split-color version quick!

The Details

Newly remastered
Red & Gold split color LP limited to 300 copies
Housed in an expanded gatefold Stoughton tip-on jacket
Includes new liner notes by Sarah Sweeney

Lee Moses was a huge talent and if he’d had the big hit album he richly deserved, Time And Place would’ve been it. A self-taught multi-instrumentalist, Moses cut his teeth in the clubs of Atlanta, the ‘Motown of the South’, where he frequently performed alongside his contemporary Gladys Knight (who reportedly wanted him for the Pips, but couldn’t pin him down).

It was, however, in New York in the ‘60s that Moses made his greatest bid to find the solo fame he desired. Moses began working there as a session player, even playing frequently with a pre-fame Jimi Hendrix, but his close relationship with producer and Atlanta native Johnny Brantley eventually saw him getting his own break via a series of 45s in 1967 – most notably with covers of Joe Simon’s “My Adorable One”, The Four Tops’ “Reach Out, I’ll Be There” and The Beatles’ “Day Tripper”.

It was 1971 before Moses’ dream of being at stage front was realized, when he released his Brantley-produced LP Time And Place for Maple Records. Recorded with a band including members of The Ohio Players and Moses’ own backing group The Deciples, it was, nonetheless, Moses himself whose star quality shone through, via his scratchy guitar riffs, his throat-ripping vocals and the stirring mood that permeates the LP’s heady mix of funk, soul and R&B.

The LP did no business, and Moses’ dream quickly crumbled. Though details on his life are scarce, it’s believed he fled New York disenchanted with the music industry, feeling he’d been double-crossed by Brantley both in credit and remuneration for the countless records he’d played on. Back in Atlanta, Moses returned to playing the clubs, married twice, and fell into depression and drug dependency. He died in 1997 at the age of 56.

Time And Place soon became a much-sought-after item for collectors, and its cult has continued to grow over the years. Here, we re-present it on deluxe vinyl, with brand new liner notes from Sarah Sweeney including interviews with Moses’ sister and his closest collaborator, the singer and guitarist Hermon Hitson. Through them, Moses becomes a little – but just a little – less of an enigma.

Price $22

Listen on Spotify

Thanks for rating this! Now tell the world how you feel via Twitter.
What Do You Think of This Release?
  • Buying!
  • Maybe Buy
  • Not My Style
  • Too Expensive